2018-2019 ESSAY ENTRY: THESE FADING PLACES, BY MATT WHITE

These Fading Places, By Matt White

In the third week of the new year, I have crossed the Mississippi River from my home state of Arkansas and am passing slowly through little Mississippi towns like Rolling Fork and Cary under winter sunlight so pretty I wish it would never end. The Sunday streets are deserted, and the closer I get to the Louisiana border, it dawns on me that everyone is inside, glued to the Saint’s playoff game. Though not apt to follow sports closely, I appreciate high stakes and will always root for all things New Orleans, the great American city that she is. I am listening to the nail-biter on the radio and thinking of everyone I love in the Crescent City. On my approach into darkening Vicksburg: the crushing last-minute defeat just down river, a soon-to-be full moon emerging from a field in my rearview mirror. Evening is falling, and every direction I turn looks the way a Lucinda Williams song sounds.

Continue reading “2018-2019 ESSAY ENTRY: THESE FADING PLACES, BY MATT WHITE”
Advertisements

2018-2019 ESSAY ENTRY: LILY, BY SHARON JIANG

Lily, By Sharon Jiang

As I close my eyes, I could still smell the aromatic chemical fumes from a typical photo development store. If you have ever walked pass one, think of it as a mixture of ammonia, noxious gases, and vinegar- like acid mixed together in a chemical lab. It is undeniable an unpleasant odor. But if you need to spend 8 hours in the store; the smell sort of becomes aromatic.

This is – The One Hour Photo, also known as my second home from the age of 11-14. As a child, growing up in Shanghai and Los Angeles, I would accompany my mom, a self-taught photographer, to her store on the weekends and spent my whole day there while completing my homework. I always looked forward to it because there was an El Pollo Loco next door, which means, my reward will be waiting for me once I have completed my homework.

Continue reading “2018-2019 ESSAY ENTRY: LILY, BY SHARON JIANG”

2018-2019 ESSAY CONTEST ENTRY: TO FORGIVE, BY EDUARDO ACIERNO

To Forgive, essay by Eduardo Acierno

We were running towards each other, we’ve been running for years, slowly becoming apart, further and further away from each other every minute. Children are screaming for their mothers, neighbors are calling “enough now, come inside” but I lay awake in the deepest of night dreading for an escape.

“Come on, wake up, you’ve been sleeping for so long”
I keep repeating to myself, It’s been a few years since you’ve been stuck in that thought.
“maybe you haven’t heard the message, you see, this thing you’re feeling happens to be wise and won’t leave until it’s message has been heard.”
But I was stubborn and my ears had been shut for some time now, all I could hear was a voice inside my head telling me to give up, because finding myself was impossible, I was long gone.

Continue reading “2018-2019 ESSAY CONTEST ENTRY: TO FORGIVE, BY EDUARDO ACIERNO”

WRITE AN ESSAY, WIN A LEICA: FINALIST ENTRIES

We had a tremendous response to our essay contest and want to thank everyone who took the time to send us their essay!

All finalists will see their entries published here on the pages of Field Photographer now through the 28th, with the final selection and winner announced February 28th! Both Andrew Tonn and myself are going over all entries and selecting our favorites then comparing notes. As a bonus a special selection will be made by Gary Crickmore proprietor of World of photography in Columbus Ohio.

Continue reading “WRITE AN ESSAY, WIN A LEICA: FINALIST ENTRIES”

HOW TO BE A BETTER PHOTOG: SHOOT A PHOTO ESSAY

All Photos taken with a Leica M6ttl and a Leica 50mm f/2 Summicron on Kodak 400CN film.  All Photos from the photo essay, “The Faces of Transcarpathia.” By Andrew J. Tonn ©

MONTERREY — Most photographers have favorite subjects and preferred themes.  Some are obvious and others less so. One person shoots flowers and selfies. Another also photographs flowers and themselves but, as with any art, the subject is not always just the subject.  Robert Mapplethorpe’s beautiful black and white studies of calla lilies and tulips are far from ordinary photos of pretty flowers and Graciela Iturbide’s self-portraits are far more than another reflexive selfie.

Continue reading “HOW TO BE A BETTER PHOTOG: SHOOT A PHOTO ESSAY”

WRITE A PHOTO ESSAY, WIN A LEICA M4-P & LEICA M 50mm ƒ2 SUMMICRON LENS

DEADLINE REACHED 

WE ARE NO LONGER ACCEPTING ENTRIES

So you want to be an M photographer right? But it’s really expensive! And it just seems so far out of reach! Almost every M photographer has been there. We understand, and it’s not easy for anyone starting out to get into the Leica M system. And many times when you do manage to get ahold of that M body, you have to buy one that looks like it’s seen a war and sometimes… It has. Then you have to figure out how to get your hands on a lens, more often than not you won’t be buying a Leica lens as your first lens. But we have you covered. We’ve partnered with our friends at World of photography in Columbus Ohio to award one lucky young photographer a mint Leica M4-P and 50/ƒ2 Summicron lens!

We want to hear your stories. Not only hear them, but publish them as well. 

How can you win? Simple. Do the work.

Continue reading “WRITE A PHOTO ESSAY, WIN A LEICA M4-P & LEICA M 50mm ƒ2 SUMMICRON LENS”

HOW TO BE A BETTER PHOTOGRAPHER

Part of our mission here at Field Photographer is to help our readers become better photographers.  Both in person and from readers on-line, we are regularly asked for advice on how to become better with a camera.  The following are five things anyone can do to improve their picture making ability. None of them are terribly complicated or very expensive.  There are no cryptic, esoteric secrets involved. I don’t doubt that investing years of study and tens of thousands of dollars going to photography school would make you better than when you started (or maybe not, judging by some of what is currently in fashion from visual academia).  I am advising neither for nor against formal education. What I am saying is that there are a number of things anyone who is truly interested in the art and craft of photography can do to become much better.

Continue reading “HOW TO BE A BETTER PHOTOGRAPHER”

THE WILDS or A JEEP AMONG LAND ROVERS

It may look like deepest Africa with fields stretching over rolling hills and wide open plains that resemble the Serengeti, but it is, in fact, The Wilds of Ohio. The Wilds is a nature preserve filled with African wildlife. Every so often, this wildlife refuge was home to an off-road event exclusive to those who owned a Land Rover. We brought a Jeep.

Continue reading “THE WILDS or A JEEP AMONG LAND ROVERS”

ANNOUNCING THE KODACHROME CITIZEN ARCHIVE PROJECT

Andrew and I have a fondness for Kodachrome that often comes up in our discussions of films photography’s past and future. For my part, I never actually shot much of it. The first time I’d ever bought any was for my 2003 venture to the island nation of Haiti, and nearly all of the film I shot on that trip was stolen or lost coming back into the U.S., so I’ve never seen my own images on Kodachrome.

Continue reading “ANNOUNCING THE KODACHROME CITIZEN ARCHIVE PROJECT”

MY PANORAMIC IS A POINT AND SHOOT

A few years ago, in the last days of the common film era (CFA) and the beginning of the Age of Digital (AD), point and shoot film cameras were common items.  Even as the digital writing was on the virtual wall (for those who cared to look) the camera industry introduced an entire new format, the Advanced Photo System or APS.  The system used a self-contained, more or less idiot-proof cartridge designed to address various perceived problems with 35mm film.  It used a somewhat smaller negative (30.2mm x 16.7mm as opposed to 36mm by 24mm) (think APS-C sized sensors as opposed to “full-frame” sensors),  had no film leader and, among other features, nearly every APS camera could be easily switched between several aspect ratios. These were simply crop modes but they were briefly quite popular, so much so that many 35mm point and shoot models followed suit and added a panoramic mode.

Continue reading “MY PANORAMIC IS A POINT AND SHOOT”